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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
is not resolved. it is urging dialogue to avoid, quote, a dark tunnel. mohammed morsi has called for a day of dialogue but opposition groups rejected talks today. they walked out of meetings. the ones that bothered to show up. many didn't appear for the discussions. the egyptian opposition is demanding that a draft resolution on the constitution that is supposed to be voted on december 15th, they are demanding that vote be postponed indefinitely. they say the drafted constitution is too islamic and anti-democratic. late last night a member of the muslim brotherhood hinted as a compromise but as of right now, the rare hinted of compromise hasn't produced anything of substance. two sides still disagree over the vote and about the future of the constitution and the government. >> gregg: conner, thanks. >> with all of this going on. america is certainly sending egypt plenty of money. they get the most foreign aid of any country except for israel. an assistant for egypt has averaged $2 billion a year and military aide has held steady at about $1.3 billion since 1987. >> gregg: turning to syria
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
constitution. there are signs of trouble. the mohammed morsi's brother food is coming out, and they are mobilizing 120,000 troops during the different ways. supporters of the president say they are just defending the gains of the revolution, bill. bill: you know, who is going to win? i think everybody is watching that from around the world, including right where you are in cairo, and which way this vote will go. what is your sense after talking to people there, greg? >> reporter: most analysts we've heard from, we've seen say that president mohammed morsi constitution should pass maybe by a big margin. his muslim brotherhood party is just too well organized. they are involved in a strenuous get out the vote effort and some say there could be fraud involved with the vote. voting is going on at egyptian embassies around the world. muslim brotherhood operatives we are told busy there too helping at that vote. there could be another factor behind this constitution going forward, the folks here are just tired. it has been nearly two years since we were first here seeing the beg
night in cairo. supporters, won'ts of mohammed morsi are taking to the streets. critics of the president and the planned referendum on saturday of a new draft constitution gather outside the presidential palace. to try to tear down barriers. >> the protest will not end. >> there is a large pro-morsi gathering a week ago when they slashed. leighing many dead and danger while the authorities stood by. they fired in crowd of protesters. several were injured. "they attacked us from all directions. they randomly fired from all directions." the critics called it discriminatory. and say this is rim in addition sent of form -- reminiscent of hosni mubarak. they say he was elected democratically and protecting what is built by the revolution. morsi's government had to postpone request for imf for much-needed $4.8 million loan. "we need to hang to the dispute" said the prime minister, "in order to bring stabilization to this countr country." egypt military is calling for a national unity meeting to calm things down. morsi's muslim brotherhood said it will attend. opposition hasn't decided whether
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
a statement on state television saying political differences with mohamed morsi, the resignation comes as egyptians still go to the polls, voting in the second and final round of a constitutional refer rent dem, critics accusing him of rushing the constitution through, and many senior advisors have esigned over the past month. >> heather: italy facing a shakeup, the president dis solving parliament but when the prime minister's resignation on friday, he was appointed just 13 months ago, to steer the country away from a greek-style debt crisis and his governing coalition lost support after former prime minister silvio berlusconi's party with their support setting the stage for new general election in february. ♪ >> gregg: well, look out, from weather, leaving few areas of the country untouched. heavy snow, and strong winds, threatening to make christmas travel a real chore. the nation's airports now looking like waiting rooms. stranded passengers waiting for cancelled flights to be rescheduled and in green bay, wisconsin, home of the packers, buried in snow, so bad, lambeau field is h
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)